Galaxy Nexus vs. Droid Razr: how the specs compare

If you saw our side-by-side comparison of the Galaxy Nexus with the iPhone 4S, you might have wondered how that other big Android phone that was announced this week, the Droid Razr, stacks up. Perhaps we can compare the Razr to the iPhone later on, but for now, here is our specs comparison of the Galaxy Nexus and Droid Razr.

As with our other breakdown, I’d advise you to only use this as one of many factors that go into your buying decision. You can throw all of the upgraded specs that you want into a device, but your enjoyment of said device will be determined by the whole, not the sum of the parts. But with that said, having a 1.2GHz dual-core processor sure isn’t going to hurt anything.

Design and Dimensions

As you can see, the Razr measures at a remarkable 7.1mm thin. Its hump (at the top, by the camera) adds an unknown thickness to that, but the majority of the device establishes a new standard for smartphone thinness. That it’s a high-end, LTE-equipped smartphone makes this all the more impressive.

The Galaxy Nexus is certainly no slouch here either, coming in at 8.84mm at its thinnest point.

The Galaxy Nexus continues in the line of the Nexus S, with a curved glass front panel. It will also go button-less, while the Razr has the (pre-Ice Cream Sandwich) customary capacitive menu buttons.

Display

The display measurements can be a little deceiving at first glance. Since the Galaxy Nexus usesAndroid 4.0′s on-screen menu keys, the typical real estate on both will be around 4.3″. But the Nexus has the advantage of stretching out to the full 4.65″ when doing things like watching video.

On paper, the Galaxy Nexus appears to have the superior display, with 316 pixels per inch, compared to 256ppi for the Razr. Both have a Super AMOLED display, and will use a PenTilescheme.

Some have been disappointed with past PenTile devices, as images and text can look dotty due to the subpixel arrangement in these displays. But since PC Mag’s Sascha Segan praised the Razr’s display as “absolutely stunning” during his hands-on time, I wouldn’t panic too much about that PenTile on either phone.

The Nexus has a big advantage in pixel density, coming in at 316ppi. That’s the closest density that we’ve seen to the iPhone’s “retina” display. While the Nexus may have an advantage in density, both phones should look plenty sharp for most people.

Processor

 

Both phones have (nearly) identical processors, packing 1.2GHz with two cores. Both models are also Texas Instruments OMAP chips. The difference is that the Galaxy Nexus is powered by the 4460 model, next to the 4430 in the Razr. The Razr’s 4430 is the same CPU that is found in the Droid Bionic. The Nexus’ 4460, meanwhile, is capable of 1.5GHz speeds, so we will likely see some overclocked kernels for the Nexus coming out of the development community.

Each phone will run different software, so having similar chips won’t necessarily mean that overall speed and performance will be the same.

Memory

In the RAM category, both phones are evenly matched. A gig for the Razr, a gig for the Nexus.

Maximum download speeds

If you live in the US and are planning on buying either of these phones at launch, then you will have Verizon’s superb LTE downloads no matter which you choose. Samsung and Google finally made it official that Verizon will be the Nexus’ US carrier at launch. The Droid Razr, meanwhile, was known to be a Verizon phone from the start.

The Galaxy Nexus will also have an HSPA+ model for carriers outside the US, and (possibly) for other carriers in the US down the road. Note that the differences in estimated downloads in the image above are only due to HSPA+ estimates being lumped together with LTE estimates. The LTE models of both phones should be equal in terms of blazingly fast downloads.

Storage

Samsung and Google appear to have their sights set firmly on the iPhone in the storage department. Like Apple, they opted to skip an SD card slot and offer the phone in 16GB and 32GB models (though the iPhone is now available in 64GB as well).

The Droid Razr, meanwhile, gets 16GB of internal storage as standard, but also adds an SD card slot.

Battery

Battery life has been a big concern with the LTE phones that have been released so far, so this may be an important spec to pay attention to. The Razr has a little more juice, at 1780 mAh to the Nexus’ 1750.

Just remember that there are many software (and other hardware) factors that combine to determine battery life. We won’t know much about this until we get these two phones in our hands for some testing.

Camera

This category appears to be a clear advantage for the Razr, but that isn’t necessarily the case. The images taken by the Galaxy Nexus that were demonstrated at the Hong Kong unveiling looked impressive, and Google has added panorama shot support, along with zero shutter lag to the flagship phone. Megapixels help, but there are other factors that determine what makes a great camera.

Motorola has said that the Droid Razr will be getting upgraded to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich at the beginning of 2012, so any of those features that are software-based should be heading for the Razr as well.

Summing Up

These phones have a lot in common in the specs department. As much as people were holding out for the “Nexus Prime” (which ultimately ended up being the Galaxy Nexus), the Droid Razr has snuck in and created a difficult decision for a lot of Android users.

Perhaps the biggest spec that may be a clincher for some, is that the Galaxy Nexus will ship with Ice Cream Sandwich, while the Razr will have to wait at least a month or two. Additionally, the Razr will have Motorola’s custom UI pasted on top of Gingerbread, and that could be considered a drawback for some. The Nexus phones are all pure Android experiences, and the Galaxy Nexus will also get future Android updates much quicker than the Razr will.

We’ll look forward to doing some hands-on testing with both of these devices, but neither’s hardware is likely to disappoint in too many ways. No matter which phone tickles your fancy, choosing between these two is the kind of problem that you like to have.

Asus Transformer Prime vs. iPad 2: specs showdown

The Asus Eee Pad Transformer stood out in this year’s crowded field of Android tablets. An optional keyboard accessory, strong hardware, and a reasonable price gave many Android fans the sweet spot that they were looking for. Asus has wasted no time bringing a follow-up to market. The Eee Pad Transformer Prime not only improves on the original, but is also the first device powered by Nvidia’s quad-core Tegra 3 processor.

Since every new tablet inevitably gets compared to the market-leading iPad 2, we compiled this handy feature-by-feature specs comparison:

Design and dimensions

These are two similarly proportioned tablets. The Transformer is a little longer, and width and depth are separated by fractions of a millimeter.

Like most Honeycomb tablets, the Transformer Prime is designed for landscape mode; theiPad 2 is a portrait mode device.

Display

The displays are also similar. The Transformer’s screen is sharp and has slightly better specs than the iPad’s.

Processor

The Transformer Prime’s CPU is its killer spec. The quad-core Kal El chip debuts with the tablet: when paired with the right software, it will fly. Until apps and firmware are updated to better take advantage of those extra cores, many tasks may perform similarly to a dual-core chip.

RAM

The Transformer Prime doubles the iPad’s 512MB of RAM.

Storage

Apple doesn’t put SD card slots in iOS devices, so the iPad is available in 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB flash storage models. Asus sells the Prime in 32GB and 64GB models — with external storage via microSD card.

Wireless

The Transformer Prime is a WiFi-only tablet at launch. The iPad 2 can be bought in WiFi-only or WiFi + 3G (with a $130 premium) models.

Camera

The iPad 2 has many strengths, but its camera is not one of them. There is no contest in terms of camera quality, as the shooters in Asus’ device are far superior.

Both tablets also have front-facing cameras: 1.2MP in the Prime, and too low to bother measuring in the iPad.

Battery life

Take this with grains of salt: Asus lists twelve hours uptime for the tablet, but doesn’t specify what it’s doing during that time. Apple accurately advertises ten hours of web surfing on WiFi for the iPad.

Intangibles

Both devices transcend their specs. The Eee Pad Transformer Prime follows its predecessor by supporting an optional ($150) keyboard dock. $650 for the tablet and keyboard is a solid deal for those wanting to replace a netbook.

Another intangible for the Prime has good news and bad news: the good news is that Asus is promising an update to Ice Cream Sandwich; the bad news is that it launches with Honeycomb.

Part of the iPad’s market invincibility comes from its app library. Android’s tablet app selection has improved, but it still pales next to iPad-specific App Store apps. This has led to a catch-22 for Android tablet makers: they don’t sell because the iPad has more and better apps, but they don’t have more and better apps because they aren’t selling.

The iPad also offers iOS 5, with iCloud, improved notifications, and iTunes Match. Tablet shoppers who want the simplest, most tightly tailored tablet experience gravitate towards the iPad.

Summing up

The Eee Pad Transformer Prime won’t outsell the Kindle Fire or iPad 2 (or iPad 3), but it will fill its buyers with delight. The keyboard add-on is a practical solution to the tablets’ productivity limits, and the Tegra 3 processor is the most powerful tablet CPU there is.

The Prime isn’t an iPad killer, but one gets the impression that Asus knows that. The manufacturer isn’t having delusions of dominating the market; it’s simply focused on building a great tablet for a reasonable price. If you’re determined to buy an Android tablet — and are willing to pay $500+ — then put the Transformer Prime at the top of your list.

Lumia 900 vs. iPhone 4S vs. Galaxy Nexus: specs showdown

With yesterday’s announcement of the Lumia 900 on AT&T, Windows Phone 7 finally has a flagship phone in the US. While there have already been mid-to-high-end Windows Phones from HTC and Samsung, this is the first stateside offering from the Microsoft/Nokia alliance aside from the middling Lumia 710. What better time, then, to compare the flagship devices on the three major mobile platforms?

Design and dimensions

Attractiveness is a subjective area, but you’d be hard-pressed to find any better-looking handsets than these three. Apple, Nokia/Microsoft, and Samsung/Google have come to three gorgeous — yet distinctive — designs. Which is the most attractive? That comes down to personal taste.

The Lumia 900 has the same width as the Galaxy Nexus, but is slightly shorter and moderately thicker. It sits somewhere in between in the super-sized form of Google’s flagship and the smaller iPhone 4S.

Weight

Despite being much larger than the iPhone — and packing an LTE radio — Samsung has done a great job of making the Galaxy Nexus the lightest of the three phones. The Lumia 900, meanwhile, is a fairly beefy phone. Its display is smaller than the Galaxy Nexus’s, yet it packs an extra 25 grams. You could argue that the phone’s polycarbonate plastic build makes the tradeoff worthwhile; but on weight alone, the Lumia 900 is relatively heavy.

Display

The Galaxy Nexus has a huge 4.65-inch display, but that’s taking its virtual buttons into account. In most cases, the actual screen real estate will be about the same as the Lumia 900. That means 4.3 inches, the same as most high-end Androidphones from the last couple of years.

Meanwhile the iPhone 4S maintains the smaller 3.5-inch size that Apple has stuck with since the first iPhone in 2007. The rest of the industry is going XL, but Apple has (thus far) stuck to its “3.5 inches is the perfect size” guns. We’ll see if that changes with the iPhone 5.

The iPhone and the Nexus, however, easily trump the Lumia in terms of pixel density. Basically, it has the lowest resolution and less pixels-per-inch by far. Images and text will appear sharper on Apple’s and Google’s offerings, but one thing the Lumia 900 has up its sleeve is ClearBlack tech on its AMOLED display. Windows Phone 7′s tiles implement lots of black, and the display makes the most of this. Is it enough to overcome the lower pixel count? Much of that will come down to personal taste.

CPU

The iPhone 4S and Galaxy Nexus both carry dual-core processors, but the Lumia 900 is stuck in the old days of single-core CPUs. With that said, it’s clocked fairly high (1.4GHz) and its little brother, the Lumia 800, is no slouch in the speed department. In other words, you may not be missing a dual-core chip as much as you might think.

RAM

The Galaxy Nexus is the clear winner in the RAM department, doubling the 512MB of the iPhone and Lumia 900 with one full gigabyte.

Storage

There are some similarities in terms of storage, but the Lumia 900 lags a bit. Apple offers three storage options for the iPhone 4S, and Samsung packs 32GB into the Galaxy Nexus, but the Lumia 900 only has option, 16GB. This will be plenty for most people, but there aren’t any chances for expansion.

Battery

If the above specs look confusing, it’s because the Lumia 900 has yet to have its battery thoroughly tested. The estimates for the 4S and Galaxy Nexus should be sound, but, at this moment, we only have the electrical charge of Nokia’s handset on record.

Camera

The iPhone 4S probably has the best camera of the bunch, but the Lumia 900 can give it a run for its money better than most phones. Its 8MP camera is identical to the excellent camera found in the Lumia 800 and the N9. The iPhone will shoot higher-resolution video, at 1080p next to the Lumia 900′s 720p.

Intangibles

The Lumia 900′s greatest differentiating factor is its status as the Windows Phone flagship that the US has been waiting for. Windows Phone 7 is a beautiful platform, but it hasn’t sold well. The Lumia 900 will give Americans a glimpse of the tiled interface on an impressive piece of hardware. Few electronic devices feature such an attractive combination of hardware and software. It will be interesting to see how US customers react to the first fine fruit born of the Nokia and Microsoft alliance.

Even if the App Store were the only differentiating factor for the iPhone, it would still be a major distinction. It houses more apps than the Android Market does, and many more apps than the Windows Phone Marketplace. Additionally, you could argue that it also has more quality apps than either of the other platforms.

The Galaxy Nexus, meanwhile, is still the only phone that ships with the latest and greatest edition of Android, Ice Cream Sandwich. The update may signify the biggest leap forward for Android since the launch of Eclair in late 2009. Though it offers features like Face Unlock, Panoramic photos, and lock screen actions, it’s the overall improvements to the UI that define ICS. It’s smoother, quicker, and more attractive than any previous version of Android.

Lumia 800 vs. iPhone 4S: how the specs compare

It’s no secret that the world of high-end mobile phones is currently dominated by the iOS andAndroid operating systems. To help you get a perspective on their latest releases, we gave you head-to-head spec comparisons between the iPhone 4S and the Galaxy Nexus, and then between the Droid Razr next to the Galaxy Nexus.

While those two platforms are the kings of the hill right now, Nokia showed us what a Windows Phone 7.5 handset can look like this week, with the gorgeous Lumia 800. Why not put it next to the iPhone 4S, and see how they size up?

Of course you’d be wise to look beyond just specs when shopping for a new device. If technical specifications were the only thing that mattered, then Android tablets would likely be taking a much bigger piece of the iPad’s pie. With that said, you can learn a lot about a device’s capabilities by looking at the individual components that it’s made of.

Design and dimensions

Both phones are similarly proportioned, with one exception. The Lumia is slightly wider, and longer by a hair. The biggest difference in dimensions is that the Lumia is thicker than the 4S. As new devices like the Galaxy Nexus and Droid Razr are racing to see who can become the thinnest, it’s interesting that Nokia’s handset measures a little chunkier than the last two iPhones.

Both of these phones are quite the lookers. While you’ve likely grown accustomed to the look of the iPhone 4S by now (it’s identical to last year’s iPhone 4), it’s hard to find a slicker-looking device. An aluminum antenna is sandwiched between two panels of glass. Even if you prefer a more rounded, less angular device, it’s hard to argue that the iPhone 4S isn’t classic Apple design at its finest.

The Lumia 800, meanwhile, brings something that we haven’t seen a lot of in smartphone bodies – color. It will be available in cyan (above) and magenta, in addition to the familiar black. The body of the phone has a more unified build than many recent handsets, with its smooth one-piece body. If you saw pictures of the Meego-running Nokia N9, it’s virtually identical to the Lumia.

Display

 

The Lumia’s display is slightly larger than the iPhone’s, but has a lower resolution. The screen uses curved glass to create an effect of blending in with the body of the phone. In that regard, the greatest strength of the Lumia’s display may be that it lends itself to the illusion of no separation between display and body. Windows Phone’s heavy use of deep blacks, next to the black front bezel, will only accentuate this effect.

Pixel density tilts heavily in the iPhone’s favor, though 252ppi on the Lumia’s AMOLED display shouldn’t disappoint too many people.

Processor

Nokia went in an interesting direction here, foregoing a dual-core CPU, and instead opting for a single-core 1.4GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon S2 chip. The iPhone 4S, meanwhile, carries Apple’s dual-core A5 system-on-a-chip, underclocked at 800MHz.

We’ll look forward to getting these two phones side-by-side for some performance testing, but we do already know that the iPhone 4S runs iOS 5 with no lag whatsoever. While some could be let down by the single-core CPU in the Lumia, the Windows Phone software library isn’t currently heavy on resource-intensive apps, so perhaps this single core chip, with a relatively high clock rate, will suffice.

Memory

Both phones are equals in the RAM department, coming in at 512MB. Some were surprised thatApple opted for half of the iPad 2′s 1GB in the 4S, but its performance doesn’t appear to be suffering without the extra memory. Perhaps Nokia and Microsoft came to the same conclusion regarding the Lumia and Mango.

Storage

While neither handset offers SD card support, the iPhone gives you more options for on-board storage. This is another area where Windows Phone’s much younger app library shows its face. Without the extensive library of huge games that the App Store has, there’s less of a need for the extra storage on the Lumia. Still, those who like to store their entire music library or several movies on their device may be disappointed with a maximum of 16GB.

Microsoft’s Skydrive service can help to make up for this, as owners of the phone will get 25GB of free cloud storage.

Battery life

I’d recommend taking the above estimates with many grains of salt. Apple is known for giving solid battery life estimates on both their iOS devices and MacBooks, while many other manufacturers’ claims are known for falling short. With that said, it looks like Nokia is promising longer talk time, and more standby, while the iPhone claims to have longer video playback.

For those more interested in the hardware, the Lumia 800 has a 3.7V 1450mAh battery. The iPhone’s, meanwhile, is a 3.7V 1420mAh model. As always, software and other hardware features can have at least as big of an effect on actual battery life.

Camera

While the iPhone 4S’ camera has been heralded as exceptional for a smartphone camera, the Lumia will also have a particularly high quality camera. We know this because it appears to be identical to the camera in the Nokia N9. The pictures that the N9 takes hold up fairly well next to the 4S (though the 4S still has an edge in terms of color vibrance and lighting).

One major difference in the camera department comes in terms of the front shooter. Namely, the iPhone 4S has one and the Lumia does not. Mobile video chat may not have caught on the way some expected it to, but if you want the option, the Lumia isn’t the phone for you.

Summing up

Regardless of the hardware we compared above, the biggest spec may be that of availability. If you live in the US, you can get the iPhone 4S right now, while there is no information regarding an American launch for the Lumia. Nokia hasn’t had much of a presence in the states for some time, and it doesn’t look like they’re rushing to change that. Perhaps it’s part of a joint strategy with Microsoft to build an international presence, while easing into the US market. Either way, it will be available throughout most of Europe in November.

We excluded download speeds, as the Lumia obviously has no carrier info for a US release. The iPhone 4S, as you probably know, will get 3G speeds on Verizon and Sprint, and you may get HSPA 14.4 (“4G” according to AT&T) speeds on AT&T.

So while many won’t even have the choice between these two phones yet, the Lumia 800 is significant enough of an entry that it’s worth profiling. Microsoft needs their Nokia Windows Phones to be something special to have a hope of gaining some significant market share, and this phone has the ingredients (particularly in terms of design) to help them do that.

New iPad vs. iPad 2: how the specs compare

After months of rumors and speculation, it’s here. The iPad 3 aka the iPad HD aka the iPad 2S is now simply known as… iPad. Yes, Apple appears to have dropped the numbering system from the iPad line and is simply calling this “the new iPad.”

That doesn’t, however, take away from how significant of an upgrade this new iPad is. Don’t let anyone convince you that this is a minor update because it doesn’t have a quad-core CPU, Siri, or a portal gun.

Let’s take a look at how the 3rd generation iPad stacks up against its predecessor, the iPad 2.

Dimensions

The two iPads are almost identical in form. The new iPad is slightly thicker, but you aren’t likely to notice unless you’re juggling it with an iPad 2.

Weight

As with the thickness, the 2012 iPad is slightly heavier than the iPad 2.

If you think the new iPad is off to a lousy start, you’ll want to move on to the next category…

Display

Yes, that long-anticipated Retina Display is here. The new iPad’s killer feature is its 2048×1536 display. This is double the resolution and 4x(!!) the pixels that are in the iPad 2 display.

You can expect text, images, icons, and everything in between to look much cleaner and crisper on the new display. If this were the only new feature in the iPad 3 (aka the new iPad), it would still be worth the upgrade.

Processor and graphics

Apple hasn’t released the clock rate of the new A5X chip, but it — like the A5 — is a dual-core beast. Its big upgrade comes in the graphics department, where it grows to four cores.

RAM

Note that the 1GB listed for the new iPad hasn’t been confirmed by Apple, but it appears to have been revealed by the development community (some iOS 5.1 code shows 1GB of RAM). If this is the case, then that should give it a bit of extra zip over the iPad 2.

Storage

Though the iPad 2 has, up to this point, been available in 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB options, it won’t any longer. Apple only kept the 16GB version around as a budget option for $399. The new iPad, meanwhile, offers all three of the same storage options that the first two iPads did.

Wireless

The 3rd generation iPad is the first Apple device to run on LTE. Those who opt for the (more expensive) wireless edition will have the choice of AT&T’s or Verizon’s speedy 4G networks.

Battery

Despite the enhancements to the new iPad, Apple is saying that it will get equal battery life to the iPad 2. It likely has a bigger battery inside to accomplish this task.

Camera

This is another big upgrade for the iPad 3 (new iPad). The cameras in the iPad 2 are just barely there, while the iSight camera in the 2012 model is quite good. Though it has less megapixels than the iPhone 4S (5MP to the 4S’ 8MP), it has the same “advanced optics.” This includes a backside illumination sensor (to help take great shots in low light), an ƒ/2.4 aperture, and a five-element lens.

The camera in the new iPad also shoots 1080p video.

Intangibles

The biggest miscellaneous perk for the iPad 2 is its (newly dropped) price. Apple will sell you the 16GB WiFi-only model for $399, or the 16GB WiFi + 3G model for $529. Though it’s hard to recommend it over the brand spankin’ new iPad, it is dipping down closer to the price range of the Kindle Fire — creating more of a dilemma for budget-minded customers.

That Retina Display in the new iPad, meanwhile, is worth accentuating again. Make no mistake: despite the better camera, LTE, upgraded GPU, and bigger battery, the display is the big selling point here. If you’re still tempted to buy a cheaper iPad 2 over the new iPad, then we at least ask you to first see the Retina Display in person. The older iPads will look fuzzy and pixelated next to it.

One more intangible worth noting is that the new iPad gets voice dictation (not to be confused with Siri). The iPad 2 apparently won’t be getting an update for dictation.

The bottom line is that we’re comparing a cutting-edge piece of hardware with last year’s model. For most people, the Retina Display alone will make the new 3rd generation iPad worth the extra money (at least $100 extra). Consider the other upgrades to be a nice bonus.

Droid Razr Maxx vs. iPhone 4S: how the specs compare

razr maxx vs iphone - showdown

It’s only been a few months since the Droid Razr released, and Motorola has already given us a sequel. OK, so maybe the Droid Razr Maxx isn’t a proper sequel — after all, there are only two differences between it and its predecessor. But some would say that those two differences are enough to make it a very different phone.

Read on for our examination of how the specs of the latest addition to the Droid family stack up next to the top-selling smartphone in the world, the iPhone 4S.

Dimensions

razr maxx vs iphone -  dimensions

Here is the Droid Razr Maxx’s first change from the Droid Razr: it’s thicker. The original Droid Razr drew headlines and created buzz as the world’s thinnest smartphone. Its battery, however, created problems for many people (standard fare for LTE Android phones).

The Razr Maxx comes with a better battery, but, in the process, it takes away the Razr’s claim to fame. The Maxx is barely thinner than the iPhone 4S, which is rocking an 18-month-old design.

Weight

razr maxx vs iphone - weight

That bigger battery isn’t helping the Razr Maxx’s weight either. It’s heavier than the iPhone 4S by 5g. Keeping some perspective, though, these are still two relatively light smartphones.

Display

razr maxx vs iphone - display

As is often the case, we have a super-sized Android display going up next to the same 3.5 inch screen size that the iPhone has sported since its debut in 2007.

The resolutions of both phones are nearly identical, but since it’s spread out over an extra 0.8 of an inch on the Razr Maxx, the iPhone 4S has much higher pixel density. This means sharper text and images.

Processor

razr maxx vs iphone - cpu

Both handsets have dual-core processors, but the one in the Razr Maxx is faster. The A5 in the iPhone 4S is set at 1GHz in the iPad 2, but Apple has underclocked it to 800MHz in the iPhone 4S.

RAM

razr maxx vs iphone - ram

The Razr Maxx also has more RAM, 1GB next to the iPhone’s 512MB. The faster processor and additional RAM don’t necessarily make the Razr Maxx a faster phone though. Since Apple controls its own hardware and software, it can strike (what it believes is) the right balance for optimal performance.

With that said, specs don’t lie. The Razr Maxx has a turbo-charged processor and plenty of RAM.

Storage

razr maxx vs iphone 4s - storage

This is similar to many comparisons that you’ll see between the iPhone and high-end Android phones. The iPhone is offered in three flash storage options (which are priced accordingly), with no expansion card slot. The Razr Maxx comes in one flash storage capacity, but also gives you a microSD card slot.

The bottom line is that both phones offer options for plenty of storage, but, as microSD cards can generally be had for cheap, it will cost you more to max out your iPhone storage than it will to max out your Razr Maxx storage. That could be cancelled out by the Razr Maxx’s $300 cost though (the 16GB iPhone 4S is $200 while the 32GB is $300).

Wireless Data

razr maxx vs iphone 4s - connectivity

If maximum data speeds are what you’re looking for, then the Razr Maxx is the clear winner. It rides on Verizon’s speedy LTE network, while the iPhone 4S is (mostly) still living in the land of 3G.

The only (sort of) exception is the AT&T version of the 4S, which can hit theoretical speeds of 14.4Mbps. Though this is the same network that was advertised as “4G” on the Motorola Atrix (and a few other phones), your actual speeds are more likely to rival Sprint’s WiMax (at best) than Verizon’s LTE.

Battery

razr maxx vs iphone 4s - battery

Until extensive testing is done on the Razr Maxx’s battery, there’s no way to draw a fair comparison here. We would take Motorola’s advertised talk times with many grains of salt, but 3300mAh should help the Razr Maxx to last longer than most LTE Android phones (most of which don’t last very long at all).

There has been a recent controversy about the iPhone 4S’s battery life, but this appears to be a mostly isolated issue. We haven’t been able to reproduce it ourselves, despite testing on several units. If you do buy an iPhone 4S, you’ll almost certainly be pleased with its uptime.

Camera

razr maxx vs iphone 4s - camera

Both phones have cameras that sport 8MP. There are other factors that determine photo quality — and they probably favor the iPhone 4S. The iPhone also shoots 1080p video, vs. 720p in the Razr Maxx.

Intangibles

razr maxx vs iphone 4s - intangibles

No, the Razr Maxx won’t turn you into Batman. Its back, however, is coated with Kevlar, the same material that the fictional Batsuit is made of in Christopher Nolan’s recent films. It might be a gimmick, but, if nothing else, it will give your phone a sturdy feel and may protect it from damage.

Meanwhile the iPhone 4S comes with Siri, the most advanced voice recognition system on any smartphone. Siri, however, is still in its infancy and has a relatively limited number of uses. It’s a gamechanger for some people and something many other people have but will never, ever use (or even know it’s there).

One caveat to add is that jailbreaking the iPhone 4S adds more functionality, and options for customization. If that’s your cup of tea, then you’d be wise to buy soon (before Apple patches the exploit). It may be a while until the iPhone 4S has another jailbreak.

Of course Android phones come with (almost) jailbreak-like levels of customization out-of-the-box. If maximum customization is your thing and you don’t want to bother with hacking, then perhaps Android — and the Droid Razr Maxx — would be a good fit for you.

Courtesy:geek.com

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Lumia 900 vs. iPhone 4S vs. Galaxy Nexus: specs showdown

With yesterday’s announcement of the Lumia 900 on AT&T, Windows Phone 7 finally has a flagship phone in the US. While there have already been mid-to-high-end Windows Phones from HTC and Samsung, this is the first stateside offering from the Microsoft/Nokia alliance aside from the middling Lumia 710. What better time, then, to compare the flagship devices on the three major mobile platforms?

Design and dimensions

Attractiveness is a subjective area, but you’d be hard-pressed to find any better-looking handsets than these three. Apple, Nokia/Microsoft, and Samsung/Google have come to three gorgeous — yet distinctive — designs. Which is the most attractive? That comes down to personal taste.

The Lumia 900 has the same width as the Galaxy Nexus, but is slightly shorter and moderately thicker. It sits somewhere in between in the super-sized form of Google’s flagship and the smaller iPhone 4S.

Weight

Despite being much larger than the iPhone — and packing an LTE radio — Samsung has done a great job of making the Galaxy Nexus the lightest of the three phones. The Lumia 900, meanwhile, is a fairly beefy phone. Its display is smaller than the Galaxy Nexus’s, yet it packs an extra 25 grams. You could argue that the phone’s polycarbonate plastic build makes the tradeoff worthwhile; but on weight alone, the Lumia 900 is relatively heavy.

Display

The Galaxy Nexus has a huge 4.65-inch display, but that’s taking its virtual buttons into account. In most cases, the actual screen real estate will be about the same as the Lumia 900. That means 4.3 inches, the same as most high-end Androidphones from the last couple of years.

Meanwhile the iPhone 4S maintains the smaller 3.5-inch size that Apple has stuck with since the first iPhone in 2007. The rest of the industry is going XL, but Apple has (thus far) stuck to its “3.5 inches is the perfect size” guns. We’ll see if that changes with the iPhone 5.

The iPhone and the Nexus, however, easily trump the Lumia in terms of pixel density. Basically, it has the lowest resolution and less pixels-per-inch by far. Images and text will appear sharper on Apple’s and Google’s offerings, but one thing the Lumia 900 has up its sleeve is ClearBlack tech on its AMOLED display. Windows Phone 7′s tiles implement lots of black, and the display makes the most of this. Is it enough to overcome the lower pixel count? Much of that will come down to personal taste.

CPU

The iPhone 4S and Galaxy Nexus both carry dual-core processors, but the Lumia 900 is stuck in the old days of single-core CPUs. With that said, it’s clocked fairly high (1.4GHz) and its little brother, the Lumia 800, is no slouch in the speed department. In other words, you may not be missing a dual-core chip as much as you might think.

RAM

The Galaxy Nexus is the clear winner in the RAM department, doubling the 512MB of the iPhone and Lumia 900 with one full gigabyte.

Storage

There are some similarities in terms of storage, but the Lumia 900 lags a bit. Apple offers three storage options for the iPhone 4S, and Samsung packs 32GB into the Galaxy Nexus, but the Lumia 900 only has option, 16GB. This will be plenty for most people, but there aren’t any chances for expansion.

Battery

If the above specs look confusing, it’s because the Lumia 900 has yet to have its battery thoroughly tested. The estimates for the 4S and Galaxy Nexus should be sound, but, at this moment, we only have the electrical charge of Nokia’s handset on record.

Camera

The iPhone 4S probably has the best camera of the bunch, but the Lumia 900 can give it a run for its money better than most phones. Its 8MP camera is identical to the excellent camera found in theLumia 800 and the N9. The iPhone will shoot higher-resolution video, at 1080p next to the Lumia 900′s 720p.

Intangibles

The Lumia 900′s greatest differentiating factor is its status as the Windows Phone flagship that the US has been waiting for. Windows Phone 7 is a beautiful platform, but it hasn’t sold well. The Lumia 900 will give Americans a glimpse of the tiled interface on an impressive piece of hardware. Few electronic devices feature such an attractive combination of hardware and software. It will be interesting to see how US customers react to the first fine fruit born of the Nokia and Microsoft alliance.

Even if the App Store were the only differentiating factor for the iPhone, it would still be a major distinction. It houses more apps than the Android Market does, and many more apps than the Windows Phone Marketplace. Additionally, you could argue that it also has more quality apps than either of the other platforms.

The Galaxy Nexus, meanwhile, is still the only phone that ships with the latest and greatest edition of Android, Ice Cream Sandwich. The update may signify the biggest leap forward for Android since the launch of Eclair in late 2009. Though it offers features like Face Unlock, Panoramic photos, and lock screen actions, it’s the overall improvements to the UI that define ICS. It’s smoother, quicker, and more attractive than any previous version of Android.

Courtesygeek.com

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